Hidden Nursery Rhymes

Good Evening everyone! I typically don’t post twice on Sundays, but my previous post, Beauty and Race, triggered a curiosity in some of my non-Black readers. They wanted to know if I would be willing to share any more historical hidden facts regarding race and racism. Seeing how I like to use my blog to also educate in between my writing, I was happy to oblige. When we know better as a human race, we can do better as a human race. ❤️

I decided to share a clip of famous nursery rhymes that were originally penned by the composer to degrade, make fun and humiliate Black people. These nursery rhymes have since been “Whitewashed” for political correctness. You may be familiar with some of these. My hope is after you have learned the history behind these racist nursery rhymes, you will help tell others. Click here.

As a bonus, I’m going to share one more clip. Can you spot the “humor” and sarcasm in this second one? Click here to see if you can.

Until next time…

George Crum 

Do you like potato chips? If so, you have George Crum to thank. Let me tell you a little about this man and this accidental invention.

George Speck aka George Crum was an African and Native American chef, hunter and guide born in upstate New York on July 15, 1824. George Crum is credited with the invention of the potato chip and if you have never heard the fascinating story behind it, I am about to tell you.

George Crum along with his sister Katie Wicks, affectionately called “Aunt Katie”, worked together as cooks at Cary Moon’s Lake House on Saratoga Lake in Saratoga Springs, New York. One day, while Katie was skinning and cutting up some potatoes, she accidentally chipped a thin slice of potato that fell into a skillet of hot pork fat. When she scooped it out with a fork and laid it onto a plate, George spotted it and ate it.

According to relatives of the late Katie Hicks and George Crum, George “declared it good” and told Katie they will start making plenty of them. A strict cook and chef, George perfected the potato chip by cutting potatoes into thin round slices, deep frying them in pork fat and finishing them off with salt and pepper or one of this other special seasonings. It soon became a hit and soon others started to replicate his recepie.

One thing is for sure, there has been many spins on the potato chip, but there is only one person who gets the credit for this celebrated invention and that is none other than George Crum. Lays, Golden Flake, Ruffles and many others would not be in existence today if it were not for George Crum. And you know what? I am going to also add Katie Hicks. After all, if it was not for her accidentally dropping a chipped potato into that skillet of hot pork fat, George may not have gotten the idea for what we all call the potato chip.

Until next time… 

What is MyHeritage? 

In a few days, I will have my MyHeritage ancestry results. I am so excited about finding out what my African ancestry is made up of. I am confident that I will be at least 80% or more and I believe my ancestry results will show a large percentage of Nigerian and / or Ghanaian ancestry.

I love knowing that my ancestry is rich in culture and I cannot wait to share it with you. I know that my African ancestry exists inside of me because my African ancestors were strong enough and determined enough to survive the horrible Era of slavery. I get emotional sometimes thinking about it.

BookingAnita is sooooo ready for her results. Are you? Stay tuned for my video upload next week. 

Until next time… 

Readers Request 

One of the things I enjoy about my blog is using it as a platform to educate, entertain and promote my written works. It keeps my blog interesting and because of that, readers often come back for more. I had some readers outside of the United States inquire about the horrors of slavery. They read about it, but never seen any pictures.

Well, I found some and the images below are not for the faint of heart. DO NOT scroll down if you can’t handle it. You have been warned…

Branding: Branding was used by slave owners to mark their slaves in the event they tried to runaway or if another slave owner tried to steal them. It was a painful practice because it involved heating the iron brand and pressing it deep into a slave’s flesh until it left a deep burning mark. Most slaves had to be held down because of the excruciating pain.

Whips: Whips were used to punish and scare slaves. A variety of whips were made out of different materials, the most horrific one of all was the steel wire whip because it would cut chunks of flesh away each time it was struck against a slave’s back.

Torture: Many slaves were tortured in the most inhumane ways. Some died, but most lived. The slaves who survived were left with the most barbaric scars and unimaginable pain. These are the toughest to look at…

These are the “soft” images of slavery because I didn’t want to post anything too graphic. Think these are bad? You haven’t seen NOTHING! When someone says that I should forget about slavery, that is like telling me to forget about my ancestors  and what they went through. If you can sit around and talk about your family and your history, why can’t I talk about mine?

Until next time… 

It’s Complicated 

Good Evening wonderful people! I sincerely hope that each of you are doing well. I’ve been tied up quite a bit with my first novel series The Chronicles of Neffie, but in between that time I’m still able to answer some of your questions.

When I posted about doing an ancestry test to find out what all my African ancestry consists of, a few of you had some questions about a statement I made. I had stated that I didn’t want to be 60% or less Sub-Saharan African because if it turns out that I am, I would be devastated. I want to be at least 80% or more. With me saying that, I was asked if I would be upset if I were to find that I have White ancestry. Good question. My answer to that is twofold.

Here’s the thing: White ancestry is going to be a given in most Black people living in America. For many such as myself, having that bit of ancestry is a little disturbing and heartbreaking. Why? Because as Black people, we know the sad circumstances into which it got there – – > slavery and rape. No need in me sugar coating it. It’s the truth. No need to lie. Some truths hurt…

As far as being upset by any White ancestry, I won’t be upset per se, but I will be a little annoyed by it. If you aren’t Black, then you won’t be able to relate to how I and the majority of Black people feel in regards to this. Even with me saying that, that doesn’t mean I hate Europeans / White people. If you are a good person regardless of your race and care for your fellow man, then you are good in my book. 

Until next time… 

I Just Might… 

So, I just received my MyHeritage kit in the mail yesterday and now I’m nervous. Let me first clarify something I had mentioned in a previous blog post. I had stated that I was “awaiting my results” but that statement was not correct. What I should have said was that I was awaiting for my test kit to arrive. Now, that statement sounds much better than the other. I don’t know what I was thinking…

Now that I have cleared that up, I’ve been thinking about video taping my results once they have been received since this was asked of me. I just might do it if I don’t talk myself out of it. I have to be straight up with you, if my results show that I’m 60% or less Sub-Saharan African, I will be devastated. No, I will be crushed! I want it to be AT LEAST 80% or more. Just being honest.

One thing I’m excited about is finding out what parts of Africa my ancestry is made up of. Ghana? Nigeria? Congo? Benin/Tongo? Ah,  the excitement is just too much. I would love to have my results before the release of The Chronicles of Neffie. Like seriously! Now don’t count me out, I might just record my reaction to my ancestry results. I just might…

Let there be excitement and no disappointment.

Until next time… 

Sarah E. Goode 

Good Evening to you all. I hope that everyone is still doing well. This will be my last post this evening since I will be busy making preparations for my upcoming novel The Chronicles of Neffie next week. Are you ready to learn something new? Of course you are. Let’s do this! 😉

Sarah E. Goode. Hmmm? Does that name ring a bell? Probably not to most people even though her invention has taken on many shapes throughout the years…

Sarah E. Goode was an African American inventor of what was called during her time a “cabinet bed.” What made her and her invention so significant was the fact that she had it patented. As history has shown, many African Americans invented a lot of things, but due to slavery they were unable to get it patented. The laws at that time allowed the slave masters to receive the credit, the patent and the recognition for the invention rather than the slaves. Why? Because slaves were viewed as property and nothing else. How sad…

Sarah E. Goode’s invention of the cabinet bed would take on new shapes and become what is now known as the Murphy bed. Some credit her invention with the invention of the Pull Out bed since it is from the same concept.

Sarah came up with this idea out of necessity to save on space since most African Americans lived in small or cramped places. Her invention doubled as a desk and a bed like some of the Murphy beds that we see today. You have to admit, that was pretty genius of her to come up with something like that during her time! Go Sarah!

Sarah E. Goode stands out to me for two reasons. One, she looks a lot like my Maternal Great, Great Aunties and two, she held on to her idea and invention long enough to get it patented so no one else would take the credit! She was a smart, smart lady. You cannot blame her for doing that. The next time you think about ordering a Murphy bed or Pull Out bed, think of Sarah E. Goode. Millions owe her chic modern design a lot of thanks for a good night’s rest! 

Until next time…