Second Thoughts?

Good Evening! How’s it going? I hope to find each of you doing well. I’ve been busy trying to play catch up after my move. Now that things are beginning to settle, I’ve had a little time to reflect on my writing projects.

I have to be honest and say that I’ve been having second thoughts about one of the two stories that I’m working on. The Chronicles of Neffie isn’t one of them. I don’t know what to think of such troublesome thoughts except to say that I’m going to go forward any way with writing it. I can’t stop now nor will I share much about it at this point in time.

I knew this one would take a lot out of me, I just knew it, but I have to stick with it. I don’t like starting something and not finishing it.

Oh brother, here we gooooooooo!

Until next time…

My First Big Move

Good Evening Good People! I hope that everyone is doing well. Quite a bit has happened since my last post, but for the most part, it has been good. Grateful and thankful for that.

I was offered another job a few states away and I’m trying to get settled. Moving is always hectic but when you are moving by yourself, it’s cha-cha-chaotic! Adding to that, my writing had to be put on hold because I’m still trying to get situated and settled. It’s been two weeks already, sheesh!

I can’t wait to get back to my writing but first, I have to work on my swollen feet. Running up and down my stairs to move and driving for hours a few states away has taken a toll on my little feet. My feet ain’t NEVA been this swollen…

This writer hopes to be back in another month with some more good news so stay tuned.

Whatever it is you are aspiring to do, I sincerely hope that it happens for you.

Until next time…

Quirky and Inspirational

I was looking for some quirky inspirational drawings and I stumbled across three I liked. These are guaranteed to make you smile and I wanted to share them with my fellow aspiring writers and bookworms. 🤗

Kudos to the the creative minds behind these. 😉 Now that’s what I call creative inspiration.

Until next time, keep reading and keep writing! 📖

An Advanced ‘Thank You’

This is the year for great things to take place and I wanted to take this time before the Fall comes to thank all of my readers, subscribers and supporters. I’m sharing this on all of my blogs ahead of time.

Some of you have been with my blog since the beginning of time when it was just the few of us. Soon, you will be able to witness how far this indie author has come. Who can remember my first profile photo for this blog?

None of us can really pinpoint what the future may hold for our writing, but the most important thing is to keep on writing because you never know where your writing will take you.

Once you reach that level and most writers know what I’m referring to, don’t be afraid to look back on all the obstacles you have overcome. Think about the hard times, think about the bumps you may have encountered along the way and if you experienced heartache or pain along the way, keep that in mind too. Why? Because such reminders will keep you humble.

My heart is full knowing what is to come. I know I’ve said that a few times before, but it’s really full. There are not enough words to explain. 🙏🏾❤️🙏🏾

Until next time…

Invisible Man

Invisible Man, published in 1952, is an award winning novel by the late Ralph Ellison. It touched on personal identity, individuality and the Black experience.

I personally found this novel to be both deep and telling. I could relate to some of the things he wrote about because I’m Black and I know how it feels to be “invisible” at times. Invisible in the sense where I’ve been purposefully overlooked or left out due to my color. Such experiences happened while at work and yet, they think I don’t notice. I notice it, but I must confess, I’m used to it. The majority of Black people are.

Since I’m an observer and thinker by nature, I would like to hear thoughts from those who also read this amazing novel. Regardless of your race or racial background, I would like to know what were your thoughts on Invisible Man. I enjoy hearing other people’s opinions and point of views. As always, if you are too shy to leave your comment, you can always shoot me an email.

If you have never read Invisible Man, you should. There is a reason why it won the National Book Award.

Until next time…

Homer Plessy

When I mention the name Homer Plessy, that name doesn’t seem to ring a bell to most people. When I mention the landmark case he was involved in, then his name suddenly rings a bell. What landmark case am I referring to? Plessy v. Ferguson.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with this case, the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling backed and upheld the practice of racial segregation in regards to the Separate Car Act. Keep reading because the elements of this case is very intriguing.

Homer Plessy, a shoemaker, laborer, clerk and insurance agent was by law an Octoroon. If Homer wanted to, he could have kept his African ancestry hidden and passed for White, but he refused to. Instead of passing, Homer along with other Free People of Color decided to use their racially ambiguous appearance to challenge the Separate Car Act.

Below is a picture of the first African American governor P.B.S. Pinchback, another racially ambiguous man.

P.B.S. Pinchback

Homer, along with the Citizens Committee, decided to violate Louisiana’s separate car law. Homer and the Citizens Committee wanted to show that if you can’t always tell who is White and who is Black, then why should there be laws in place to separate Whites from Blacks? They had a valid point. Keep reading because it’s about to get even more interesting.

When Homer boarded the “Whites Only” train car, he had no problems boarding. When the conductor came to collect his ticket, Homer told him he was 7/8th White and that he refused to sit in the “Blacks Only” car. Needless to say, everyone within that Whites only car immediately became upset. Why? Because they assumed Homer was White. Had he not revealed himself, no one would have ever suspected his racial background.

Homer and the Citizens Committee had hoped to prove their valid point that if you can’t tell who is really Black and who is really White, why create separate laws? They lost their case due to the insurmountable racism and discrimination that existed during their time, but their efforts were not totally in vain.

The Plessy v. Ferguson case played a huge role in the Brown v. Education case. The Plessy v. Ferguson case was eventually overturned by the Supreme Court decision in the Brown v. Board of Education case. Racial segregation was completely outlawed by the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Ask yourself this: If Homer Plessy were to stand in front of you, would you be able to detect his African ancestry? What about the rest of the racially ambiguous men who were apart of the Citizens Committee? These men were Free People of Color who could have passed for White as well. Do you know who the racially ambiguous man is below?

I’ll give you a hint: he played a major role in the Plessy v. Ferguson case, he too could have passed for White, was often mistaken as White, but he wasn’t White. In fact, he was half Haitian and half Cuban. Drop your answer in the comments if you think you know. 🤔 I will reveal the answer Tuesday evening.

Until next time…

Lucille Clifton

For Black History Month, I wanted to share one of my favorite quotes by the late poet Lucille Clifton. Lucille’s works of poetry were so good that she almost won a Pulitzer Prize twice.

Lucille is known for several of her quotes, but there is one quote of hers that stands out from the rest. This particular quote was born out of her frustration with racism and discrimination. Lucille was born in 1937, so one can easily see how frustrating it must have been to live during that time as a Black person.

When you see this quote of hers, you will instantly have a connection to it. Why? Because millions of people use this very same quote to offer encouragement and advice. What quote am I referring to?

This one:

Do you agree? 👆🏾 I do.

Until next time…